5 Things to Know About AIFRB Member Alexander Tasoff

5 Things to Know About AIFRB Member Alexander Tasoff

5 Things to Know About AIFRB Member Alexander Tasoff

Meet AIFRB member - Alexander Tasoff

"One of the most alarming environmental events affecting marine species today is ocean acidification. However, it remains unclear whether marine fishes can develop greater tolerance to this phenomenon. For my thesis research, I am investigating the genetic capacity of coastal fish populations to adapt to declines in ocean pH." AIFRB member - Alexander Tasoff

"One of the most alarming environmental events affecting marine species today is ocean acidification. However, it remains unclear whether marine fishes can develop greater tolerance to this phenomenon. For my thesis research, I am investigating the genetic capacity of coastal fish populations to adapt to declines in ocean pH."   AIFRB member - Alexander Tasoff

"One of the most alarming environmental events affecting marine species today is ocean acidification. However, it remains unclear whether marine fishes can develop greater tolerance to this phenomenon. For my thesis research, I am investigating the genetic capacity of coastal fish populations to adapt to declines in ocean pH."

AIFRB member - Alexander Tasoff

  1. He researches the genetic capacity of fish populations to adapt to ocean acidification, to understand how harvested species respond to changes in ocean chemistry, which will allow scientists and managers to anticipate population-level dynamics under predicted ocean acidification patterns.
  2. He is a member of Americorps, where he has supported the State Water Resources Control Board with fishery restoration agendas; measured the water chemistry of fish-bearing streams with environmental monitoring equipment; gathered data on salmonid populations and built a GIS database, which has the agency to make informed decisions about watershed management.
  3. His CSULB research included investigating the effects of ocean acidification on harvested marine fishes. 
  4. He was a research intern at Monterey Bay Aquarium, where he surveyed sea otter populations in California via field-techniques, including radio-telemetry and GPS tracking, and analyzed data on sea otter demographics and monitored otter foraging behavior within marine protected areas.
  5. At UC Davis, he analyzed how algal blooms affected coastal sea-grass communities; primed seafloor sediment samples to measure the organic material deposited on benthic habitats; performed data entry to organize faunal species counts on sea-grass beds throughout the year; and investigated the immigration of exotic species into California coastal ecosystems, using Image J to enumerate the area taken up by exotic species within experimental plots, helping to advance the knowledge on invasive fauna demographics in marine-fouling communities. 

     

 
 

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